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The article you requested is

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Ziprasidone Monotherapy in Bipolar Disorder With Co-Occurring Lifetime Panic or Generalized Anxiety Disorder

J Clin Psychiatry 2014;75(1):77-84
10.4088/JCP.12m08297
Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

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Objective: Bipolar disorder often co-occurs with anxiety disorders. Evidence suggests that second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) may be useful in treating both conditions. This study examined the efficacy of ziprasidone in the treatment of these disorders.

Method: This 3-site, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group, 8-week trial of ziprasidone monotherapy examined 49 subjects with bipolar disorder and lifetime panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) experiencing moderately severe anxiety symptoms at entrance into the study. Both bipolar disorder and anxiety diagnoses were based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Patients were screened and randomized from June 25, 2010, through August 23, 2011. Primary outcome measures were the Clinical Global Impressions-21 Anxiety Scale (CGI-21 Anxiety) and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), with secondary measures monitoring anxiety and mood symptoms.

Results: Last-observation-carried-forward analyses demonstrated that patients in the ziprasidone group did not improve significantly more than those in the placebo group on the CGI-21 Anxiety (F1 = 0.34; P = .564) or SDS (F1 = 0.26; P = .611). Secondary analysis using hierarchical linear modeling found similar results (CGI-21 Anxiety: F1 = 1.82; P = .178; and SDS: F1 = 0.70; P = .408). Regardless of group, time in the study was associated with significant decrease in anxiety (F1 = 11.08; P = .001) and total disability (F1 = 26.16; P < .001). Patients in the ziprasidone group showed a greater increase in abnormal involuntary movement, and 81.8% (n = 9) of the subjects who withdrew from the study due to adverse events, serious adverse events, or side effects were in the ziprasidone group.

Conclusions: Results suggest that ziprasidone monotherapy was not associated with a clinically significant improvement in anxiety symptoms or improved function for patients with bipolar disorder, lifetime panic disorder or GAD, and concurrent moderately severe anxiety symptoms, and it was associated with a more negative side-effect profile relative to placebo.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01172652

J Clin Psychiatry

Submitted: November 23, 2012; accepted April 17, 2013.

Online ahead of print: November 26, 2013 (doi:10.4088/JCP.12m08297).

Corresponding author: Trisha Suppes, MD, PhD, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Ave (151T), Palo Alto, CA 94304 (tsuppes@stanford.edu).